Conference Program

This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification Program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and approved by the University of Calgary Office of Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development. You may claim a maximum of 21 hours.

An overview of the conference schedule

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Or view the 2016 program


At the end of this conference, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe new knowledge and understanding of the spectrum of dementia research, related to the areas of healthy brain aging, delaying or preventing dementia, and care services.
  2. Identify the knowledge, skills, and partners necessary to develop and promote new approaches to dementia care.
  3. Apply the knowledge identified during the conference to improve research programs, healthcare practices and educational initiatives.

*All sessions are in the Husky Great Hall unless otherwise noted

Wednesday, June 20, 2018


12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Registration Open / Light Lunch Available

1:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Opening Remarks

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Session #1 : New Frontiers of Biomarker Research in Healthy Brain Aging and Dementia: Toward Early Detection and Precision Health Application
Session Chair: Roger Dixon, University of Alberta

Speakers in this session will discuss promising new approaches and results pertaining to discovery, validation, and precision application of biomarkers reflecting mechanisms associated with differential trajectories leading to a range of brain and cognitive aging outcomes, including dementia. Key terms include risk and protection factors, multimodal, interactive networks, longitudinal, computational approaches, precision health, and translation.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to identify developing early risk reduction, protection enhancing, and precision strategies for promoting healthier brain aging, delaying impairment, and preventing dementia. As well, participants will be able to describe the multiple trajectories and full range of classifiable outcomes of brain and cognitive aging.  

Understanding Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis: from Mechanisms to Medicines
Madhav Thambisetty, National Institutes of Health

Addressing heterogeneity in neurodegenerative diseases: Application of biomarkers and precision medicine to overcome the challenges - View Abstract
Mario Masellis, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto

Alzheimer’s Biomarkers Discriminate Non-demented Cognitive Aging Trajectories and Phenotypes - View Abstract
G Peggy McFall, University of Alberta

Refreshment Break

Population perspectives on the complexity of brain ageing and dementia within changing societies - View Abstract
Carol Brayne, University of Cambridge

Abstract Presentation: Modifiable risk factor exposure in late middle-age is associated with increased inflammation 12 years later
Nicolas Cherbuin, Australian National University

Abstract Presentation: Preserved Cognitive Performance Despite Amyloid Burden Amongst Healthy Elderly: Is Cortical Thickness the Explanation?
Catherine Veilleux, Université de Sherbrooke

1:30 pm


2:00 pm



2:30pm


3:00pm

3:30pm 


4:00pm


4:15pm

 

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Poster Session #1

6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Keynote Address #1: World Health Assembly adopts global action plan on the public health response to dementia
Tarun Dua, World Health Organization

7:00 PM- 8:30 PM
Post-Keynote Reception

Thursday, June 21, 2018

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Session #2  - Disconnecting the Dots: Neurodegeneration as a Connect-opathy
Session Chair - Eric Smith, University of Calgary, and Mario Masellis, Sunnybrook Research Institute

Traditionally, research on neurodegeneration has focused on either atrophy of the whole brain or on atrophy of specific sub-regions such as the hippocampus. More recently, newer methods have enabled research on the inter-connectedness of neurodegenerative changes in multiple brain regions. Neurodegeneration often spreads within brain regions connected by white matter tracts. This session will feature talks on cutting-edge neuroimaging methods, such as diffusion tensor imaging and graph theory, to measure interconnected neurodegenerative changes in aging and in disease.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to describe neuropathology of vascular cognitive impairment, neuroimaging markers of cerebrovascular pathology and blood vessel function, cerebral amyloid angiopathy and its association with cognitive impairment, and paradigms for diagnosis and treatment of early stage patients with vascular mild cognitive impairment to prevent progression to dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration as disconnection syndromes
Brad Dickerson, Harvard Medical School

Disrupted functional and anatomical connectivity and other markers of cognitive decline in PD - View Abstract
Oury Monchi, University of Calgary       

Structural brain network disturbances and cognition in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy - View Abstract
Yael Reijmer, University Medical Centre Utrecht

Refreshment Break

Predictive analysis of an AD-disease cascade based on VBM- or Cortical-thickness-based networks -View Abstract
Stephen Strother, University of Toronto

Abstract Presentation: White matter hyperintensities affect activities of daily living differently across dementias-The Sunnybrook Dementia Study
Saira Mirza, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto

Abstract Presentation: Longitudinal Changes in Mean Diffusivity along Skeletonized White Matter Tracks in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Healthy Controls
Cheryl McCreary, University of Calgary

9:00 am

                        9:30 am 


10:00 am


10:30 am

11:00 am


11:30 am

 

11:45 am

 

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Lunch

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Session #3 - Cutting-edge Rodent Models and the Path to Diagnostics/ Therapeutics
Session Chair - Robert Sutherland, University of Lethbridge, and David Westaway, University of Alberta

At the end of this session, participants will be able to describe approaches to animal modeling of dementia, chemical markers of neuronal damage, perturbed neuroanatomical pathways that may presage the advent of mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease and, lastly, new insights and therapeutic approaches suggested by applying templated protein misfolding and spreading principles first elucidated for prion diseases.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to describe the clinical presentation of dementia, novel chemical markers of neuronal damage and protein misfolding, novel therapeutic approaches, perturbations in unexpected neuroanatomical pathways that may presage the advent of MCI or AD and new insights that may emerge from the application of prion biology.

Slow models and the challenge of sporadic disease
Frank LaFerla, University of California, Irvine

Hunting for Clues of Tau-Spreading in the Human Brain - View Abstract
Gabor Kovacs, Medical University of Vienna

Tau Cleavage and Phosphorylation in Tauopathy - View Abstract
Karen Ashe, University of Minnesota

Refreshment Break

Strains of Protein Aggregates in Neurodegenerative Diseases - View Abstract
Joel Watts, University of Toronto

Abstract Presentation: The CNS in inbred transgenic models of 4-repeat Tauopathy develops consistent Tau seeding capacity yet focal and diverse patterns of protein deposition
Ghazaleh Eskandari-Sedighi, University of Alberta

Abstract Presentation: Biomarkers of disease progression in a non-human primate model of Alzheimer’s Disease
Susan Boehnke, Queen’s University

1:00 pm


1:30 pm


2:00 pm


2:30 pm

3:00 pm


3:30 pm

 

3:45 pm  


4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Reception and Poster Session #2  

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM
Keynote Address #2: Genomic analysis of neurodegeneration
John HardyReta Lila Weston Institute – University College London (UCL) Institute of Neurology

6:30 PM -
Free Evening

Friday, June 22, 2018

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Session #4 - Exercise and Cognitive Interventions for Healthy Brain Aging and Prevention of Dementia
Session Chair - Marc Poulin, University of Calgary

This session will address the important role of lifestyle interventions such physical activity and cognitive stimulation for brain health with aging and the potential impact of these interventions for the prevention and/or delay of Alzheimer disease and related dementias (ADRD). The speakers in this session will discuss some of the latest findings in the field, including clinical and translational physiology studies, the application of recent developments (i.e., neuroimaging, biomarkers, modeling in human and animal research) to help advance our knowledge of the role of physical activity and cognitive interventions for healthy brain aging and for the prevention of dementia.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to describe influencing factors for the development of dementia that operate independently and interactively and identify novel translation tools that improve assessment of cognitive impairment and its biological determinants

Healthy Brain Aging: Effects of Exercise - View Abstract
Kirk Erickson, University of Pittsburgh

Engaging the brain of older adults: The effects of cognitive training on cognition and the brain in healthy aging and mild cognitive impairment  - View Abstract
Sylvie Belleville, Institut Universitaire de Geriatrie de Montreal

Vascular health and implications for the brain - View Abstract
Jill Barnes, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Refreshment Break

Reshaping the Path of Mild Cognitive Impairment with Exercise - View Abstract
Teresa Liu-Ambrose, University of British Columbia

Abstract Presentation: Sociodemographic and Health-Related Factors Associated with Physical Activity Levels and Participation Barriers in Canadian Older Adults
Lauren Bechard, University of Waterloo

Abstract Presentation: Effects of six-month aerobic exercise intervention on sleep in healthy older adults
Veronica Guadagni, University of Calgary

9:00 am


9:30 am 

 

10:00 am


10:30 am

11:00 am


11:30 am

 

11:45 am 


12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Lunch and Poster Viewing

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Session #5 - Applied Research in Dementia
Session Chair - Jayna  Holroyd-Leduc, University of Calgary

This session will focus on knowledge translation and implementation research initiatives targeted at improving the outcomes for persons living with dementia and their family caregivers.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to assess applied research initiatives in healthy brain aging and dementia and integrate the skills needed for the translation of evidence into practice in dementia healthcare.

Rural Dementia Action Research (RaDAR) Initiatives in Health Care Delivery - View Abstract
Julie Kosteniuk, University of Saskatchewan

Shared Decision-making with Seniors Living with Dementia and their Caregivers - View Abstract
France Légaré , Universite Laval

Making Advance Care Planning Easier - View Abstract
Rebecca Sudore, University of California, San Francisco

Refreshment Break

Managing Depression in Dementia - View Abstract
Zahra Goodarzi, University of Calgary

Abstract Presentation: What works in dementia training and education for the health and social care workforce? Findings from a UK study
Claire Surr, Leeds Beckett University

Abstract Presentation: Creating Dementia-Friendly Exercise: Experiences, Perceptions, and Needs of Community Exercise Providers
Lauren Bechard, University of Waterloo

1:00 pm


1:30 pm 


2:00 pm


2:30 pm

3:00 pm


3:30 pm

 

3:45 pm


4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Panel Discussion
Carol Brayne, University of Cambridge
David Hogan, Brenda Strafford Centre on Aging, University of Calgary
Mario Masellis, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto
Michelle Mulder, Alzheimer Society of Alberta and the Northwest Territories

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Poster Awards & Closing Remarks